Saturday, August 16, 2014

Sunday Riders

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Riding through the Black Hills of South Dakota should be a very enjoyable experience. This city of Deadwood reminded me much of Pigeon Forge, TN in the sense that it was crowded in the tiny city of hills. Unfortunately this made for slow going, just motorcycling in Pigeon Forge last summer, sweltering in the summer sun. While I recalled the stench of exhaust and the heat of my pipes frying my leg as I tried to make my way through the traffic, I was grateful the tourists were all gone now since the Sturgis Rally was over.

My gripe isn't with riding in the slow-goings of this touristy treasure, but leaving Deadwood and expecting a wide-open ride along the sweepers and twisties on our way to Hill City. Because what we found were beautiful roads, incredible, breathtaking landscapes. and the "Sunday Riders".

I'm not referring to Sunday Drivers; drivers of cars. I am referring to motorcycle riders who obviously ride very little and are not confident enough in their riding skills to take what I would consider a moderately challenging road. Now certainly I subscribe to the phrase, "Ride your own ride." I do not begrudge any motorcycle rider for taking a road slowly. One must ride withing their skill level. Taking a road very slow could be an issue of  comfort level, or a even just a choice to enjoy the scenery.

My issue lies with the amount of vehicles they hold up behind them. 5, then 10, then 12 vehicles strolling along at only 40 miles per hour when the posted speed limit is 65. On top of being incredibly selfish for everyone stuck moving at that pace, this can be dangerous. If someone got rear-ended in a blind corner because they were traveling so slow, the rider wouldn't even know the harm they caused.

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We followed these riders nearly the entire 40 miles into our destination of Hill City. Once we hit town other vehicles behind us turned onto side streets to avoid the slow-goings of the center of town. We rolled up to a restaurant which was an historic saloon for lunch and the Sunday Riders parked across the street from us. It was all I could do to not bitch them out.

My only request to you if you're going to ride slow is to PULL OVER in the turnouts and let others get by. We don't all want to go as slowly as you. And the way you can tell you are holding up traffic is if you have a few cars behind you. It never hurts to let them pass and besides, you certainly have the time don't you? After all, you aren't riding like you're in a hurry.

5 comments:

  1. Also, pulling over from time to time creates less stress for yourself. It's harder to focus on handling corners when part of you is focused on how close is the car behind. Easier to let them move on and deal with things at your own pace.

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    1. Agreed! Thanks for commenting. I realize now that I didn't proof this very well. One should never hit "Publish" when one is so tired! Ha!

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  2. Riding anything slower than the speed limit is selfish and dangerous unless you are on a back country road with no one around. I have been on small bikes that won't keep up very well and always pull over. I hate getting stuck behind those that don't. I feel your pain.

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  3. Tina,

    This is a great observation. People travelling under the speed limit should be paying attention to the traffic build-up behind them and let the other bikes/cars go around when it's safe to do so.

    I've never had much patience with riders/drivers like this. It is annoying and it is dangerous for everyone.

    Cheers,
    Curt

    Live Free. Ride Hard. Be Happy.

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  4. True! Louie and I just experienced this the other day. Makes for an uncomfortable ride when creeping along at snail pace on twisty roads. Pull over Sunday bikers! Lol

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About Sash


People call me "Sash" because I'm a former beauty queen in my old home town. My father used to ride in an MC which got me interested in the culture. After my last divorce I said "goodbye" to Susie Homemaker and became the rude biker chick I always felt inside. (Read more...)